Slide background

A grassroots organization dedicated to preserving, educating, and sharing the story of World War II-era incarceration of Japanese Americans in order to deepen understandings of American history and inspire action for equity.

Slide background

A comprehensive reference tool with nearly 1,000 free and accessible entries related to the World War II incarceration of Japanese Americans.

Slide background

Oral history interviews, photos, newspapers, and other primary sources that document the Japanese American experience from immigration through redress with a strong focus on the World War II mass incarceration.

Slide background

Online education center featuring multidisciplinary curriculum, instructional guides, and primary source material that allow teachers and students to connect with the lived experiences of Japanese Americans.

JAPANESE AMERICAN WWII INCARCERATION: THE CORE STORY

Learn the basics about World War II Japanese American incarceration through a series of short videos and essays.

Oral History Spotlight

Amy Iwasaki Mass talks about her childhood train ride to Heart Mountain, and about hateful messages in the news.

Blog

Stay connected with Densho through regular posts, guest contributions, and photo essays that put our work and the story of WWII incarceration in conversation with current events.

Stay up to date on Densho News. Sign up for our Newsletter >Subscribe

  • Topaz concentration camp opened #OTD in 1942. It's best known for the fatal shooting of an inmate by a camp sentry… https://t.co/DqeWeGiRMf
  • “'Concentration camp' is more than a rhetorical exercise, more than a historical analogy. It makes us reckon with o… https://t.co/bJtlwNKplo
  • A new book claims Japanese American incarceration was caused by "security concerns," not racism. Instead of reading… https://t.co/Vs89lUORnv
  • We’ve got just a few days left in our summer appeal and need your help closing a $12,000 funding gap. Donate befo… https://t.co/2D0y4fccwg
  • Most of the (relatively few) non-Nikkei in the camps were those married to Japanese Americans. It’s estimated there… https://t.co/3pdBQSDl3p