Densho eNews - October 2006www.densho.org

From the Director: Tom Ikeda

Welcome to Densho's first e-newsletter. I hope this monthly newsletter helps you enjoy the rich content we have collected about the Japanese American community. In each newsletter we will introduce and link to an interview, photograph, old letter or newspaper article for you to examine. In this first issue we will focus on a series of interviews recently conducted in Spokane, Washington.

The newsletter will also bring you news about Densho. This issue describes our Sushi & Sake Festival in November, a book reading by Karen Ishizuka in December and current volunteer opportunities.

From the Archive

Stories from the Inland Empire: Spokane, Washington

In March 2006, Densho embarked on an ambitious project to capture the stories of Spokane, Washington's Japanese American community. Densho staff members Tom Ikeda, Dana Hoshide and Megan Asaka traveled to Spokane to conduct life history interviews with Japanese Americans, including those born and raised in Spokane ("old-timers") and those who came during and after World War II ("newcomers"). What unfolded over the many hours of interviewing was a fascinating look into one of the few Japanese American communities in the West that did not experience mass removal and incarceration during World War II. Funded by a grant from the State of Washington, Densho collected these invaluable stories with the goal of making available to the public this important, yet little-known chapter in American history. >> more

to top

Densho Events

Fundraiser voted "Most Fun": 2006 Sushi & Sake Festival

OK, OK, so we really didn't take a vote, but if we did, I would vote for the Sushi & Sake Festival as the "Most Fun" fundraiser to attend. I love sushi and we will have over 20 different types of sushi to sample. We will also have a "more than you can drink" range of premium sake and Japanese beer to sample. This year's event will be on Thursday, November 9, 2006 from 5:30-8:30 pm at the Seattle Westin Hotel. This event sells out every year so get your tickets now. For more information about this event or to order your tickets online go to www.densho.org/sushi.


Book event with author and filmmaker Karen Ishizuka

Award-winning filmmaker Karen Ishizuka will visit Seattle on Saturday, December 2, 2006 at 2pm at the Theater off Jackson to talk about her new book "Lost and Found: Reclaiming the Japanese American Incarceration." Joining Karen will be Professor Roger Daniels, a renowned historian and scholar of Asian American history. Professor Daniels, who wrote the book's foreword, will give introductory remarks.

This free event is co-hosted by Densho and the Japanese American National Museum. >> more

to top

Volunteer Opportunities

Camp Papers

Densho is currently working on an exciting and unprecedented project to scan, digitize and make available to the public all ten War Relocation Authority camp newspapers. Volunteers are needed to help transcribe article titles a minimum of 8 hours per week. Must have access to a computer with Microsoft Word. Typing skills and attention to detail a plus. If interested, please contact Megan Asaka at megan.asaka@densho.org.


Sushi & Sake Fest

The Special Events Committee is looking for spirited and capable volunteers to assist with Densho's Sushi & Sake Fest on November 9, 2006. A great opportunity to get a behind the scenes look at one of the most popular fall events in Seattle. Many different positions are available. Please contact Naoko Magasis at naoko.magasis@densho.org for more information.

to top

Community Event

New film about why Japanese were not removed from Hawaii during WWII

Go behind-the-scenes of the battle that prevented the mass incarceration of Japanese in Hawai'i with the Mainland premiere of a new film, "The First Battle: The Battle for Equality in War-Time Hawaii" by Tom Coffman on Friday, October 6, 2006 at the Bellevue Community College Theater. Event sponsored by the BCC Center for Liberal Arts and the University of Washington's American Ethnic Studies Department. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Program starts at 7 p.m. and ends at 9:00 p.m. Panel discussion and reception to follow. Admission is free, donations accepted. For more information, contact Alan Yabui, Bellevue Community College at ayabu@bcc.ctc.edu or Tetsu Kashima, UW, American Ethnic Studies Dept. at kashima@u.washington.edu.

to top